facesofthevictorianera:

Six Union soldiers and two civilians standing on a porch (1861)

http://collections.mohistory.org/

(via portrait-1)

thecivilwarparlor:

Officers of Combined Batteries B & L, 2nd U.S. Artillery. L-R: Wilson, Vincent, Robertson, Woodruff.
Photo by James F. Gibson. Library of Congress
Fair Oaks, Va., vicinity. Capt. James M. Robertson (third from left) and officers.

thecivilwarparlor:

Officers of Combined Batteries B & L, 2nd U.S. Artillery. L-R: Wilson, Vincent, Robertson, Woodruff.

Photo by James F. Gibson. Library of Congress

Fair Oaks, Va., vicinity. Capt. James M. Robertson (third from left) and officers.

(via adesignresearcher)

thecivilwarparlor:

[Unidentified soldier in Union assistant surgeon uniform with Ames medical sword]
Of the wounds recorded in the Civil War, 70%+ were to the extremities. And so, the amputation was the common operation of the Civil War surgeon. The field hospital was hell on earth. The surgeon would stand over the operating table for hours without a let up. Men screamed in delirium, calling for loved ones, while others laid pale and quiet with the effect of shock. Only the division’s best surgeons did the operating and they were called “operators”. Already, they were performing a crude system of triage. The ones wounded through the head, belly, or chest were left to one side because they would most likely die. This may sound somewhat cruel or heartless, but it allowed the doctors to save precious time and to operate on those that could be saved with prompt attention.
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 33414 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.33414 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-33414 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
http://ehistory.osu.edu/uscw/features/medicine/cwsurgeon/amputations.cfm

thecivilwarparlor:

[Unidentified soldier in Union assistant surgeon uniform with Ames medical sword]

Of the wounds recorded in the Civil War, 70%+ were to the extremities. And so, the amputation was the common operation of the Civil War surgeon.

The field hospital was hell on earth. The surgeon would stand over the operating table for hours without a let up. Men screamed in delirium, calling for loved ones, while others laid pale and quiet with the effect of shock. Only the division’s best surgeons did the operating and they were called “operators”. Already, they were performing a crude system of triage. The ones wounded through the head, belly, or chest were left to one side because they would most likely die. This may sound somewhat cruel or heartless, but it allowed the doctors to save precious time and to operate on those that could be saved with prompt attention.

(via cedarchest)

thecivilwarparlor:

Young George Wingate Weeks of Company D, 8th Maine Infantry Regiment With Drum

THE LIFE OF DRUMMER BOYS IN THE CIVIL WAR

Life as a drummer was hard. William Bircher, who enlisted in the 2nd Minnesota Regiment in the summer of 1861 after several rejections because he hadn’t yet turned 15, kept a diary describing the hardships of war: going without hot meals for weeks on end, marching for miles without shoes, disease – Bircher suffered from dysentery – and, of course, the fear and horrors of battle that he shared with the regular Soldiers. William didn’t just play the drums. He marched, he regularly pulled guard duty and he helped with the wounded.

  • “Our band was detailed to the hospital to assist the nurses in taking care of the wounded (after the Battle of Chattanooga)” he wrote, Sept. 22, 1863. “It was heartwrending to see the poor fellows as they were brought in, shot and mangled in every possible way. Every few moments we had to take one out who had died, and put him in the dead house, where he would remain until there was a wagonload.”

During Sherman’s 1864 march through Georgia, William’s regiment lost another drummer:

  • “We lost poor Simmers, the drummer of Company G, during the night. The poor fellow, being unable to keep up, lay down somewhere along the road, and was captured by the (Confederates) that were following us up. I took his blanket and drum to relieve him, but he was too fatigued to follow, saying ‘Oh, let me rest. Let me sleep a short time. Then I will follow on.’ I tried to keep him under my eye, but he finally eluded me, and when we again stopped for a short rest, he was not to be found. By that time he was most likely a prisoner.”
- See more at: http://soldiers.dodlive.mil/2013/12/the-beats-of-battle-images-of-army-drummer-boys-endure/#sthash.CchLImpz.dpuf

thecivilwarparlor:

[Private Reuben Goodson of Co. G, 52nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment in uniform]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 34376 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.34376 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-34376 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

[Private Reuben Goodson of Co. G, 52nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment in uniform]

(via adesignresearcher)

thecivilwarparlor:

[Unidentified Cadet in Virginia Military Institute uniform]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 34334 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.34334 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-34334 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

[Unidentified Cadet in Virginia Military Institute uniform]

(via adesignresearcher)

thecivilwarparlor:

[William Snodgrass of an unidentified Virginia infantry regiment with underhammer pistol]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 37272 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.37272 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-37272 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

[William Snodgrass of an unidentified Virginia infantry regiment with underhammer pistol]

(via adesignresearcher)

thecivilwarparlor:

[Brothers Private Thomas D. Hilliard and Colonel John Hilliard of Co. C, 12th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, in uniform with Bowie knives]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 37411 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.37411 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-37411 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

[Brothers Private Thomas D. Hilliard and Colonel John Hilliard of Co. C, 12th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, in uniform with Bowie knives]

(via adesignresearcher)

thecivilwarparlor:

[Private Hiram L. Barrett of Co. K, 7th Connecticut Infantry Regiment in uniform with bayoneted musket, and nine-month-old girl, Marrie]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item, both photos) ppmsca 37474 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.37474 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-37474 (digital file from original item, both photos) LC-DIG-ppmsca-37475 (digital file from original item, left photo) LC-DIG-ppmsca-37476 (digital file from original item, right photo)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

[Private Hiram L. Barrett of Co. K, 7th Connecticut Infantry Regiment in uniform with bayoneted musket, and nine-month-old girl, Marrie]

  • Digital ID: (digital file from original item, both photos) ppmsca 37474 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.37474
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-37474 (digital file from original item, both photos) LC-DIG-ppmsca-37475 (digital file from original item, left photo) LC-DIG-ppmsca-37476 (digital file from original item, right photo)
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

(via adesignresearcher)

thecivilwarparlor:

[Unidentified soldier in Confederate uniform with shotgun sitting next to dog]
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 37480 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.37480 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-37480 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

[Unidentified soldier in Confederate uniform with shotgun sitting next to dog]

(via adesignresearcher)

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY